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Generations in the Workplace

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How is lifestyle performance management playing out differently for the different generations in the workplace? Are there vast differences between Millennials and Baby Boomers, for instance?

Management
Inclusion
Organizational Development
Pamela Paul
22 months ago

7 answers

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I really like Theory X and Y. The reality today is probably in the middle, there is a mixture of these. This is micromaniging (that I don't like at all) vs hands off (but you need trust). Both can (or can't) be applied in different situation. For example I will not use Theory x (and micromaniging) for a team of experts. If a team is not motivated, Theory Y is not the right solution.

Paolo Beffagnotti
11 months ago
Remember, it is for the 80/20 rule - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
Not for grunts - the remaing 20% for upper level - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
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I would like to share an interesting study run by Nielsen on the generational views (not only Millennials and Baby Boomers but even Generation Z, X and Silent) about how we live.
http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/insights/news/2015/the-facts-of-life-generational-views-about-how-we-live.html

Paolo Beffagnotti
22 months ago
Theory X and Theory Y is great for motivation - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
Nielsen is getting well known, as well. - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
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I would say a big difference is in the speed, size and number of simultaneous 'cycles' in which they work. What I mean with that is that 'older' workers tend to prefer spending larger amounts of time on single tasks for a longer time to bring these to a close. 'younger' workers tend to prefer spending shorter amounts of time on a single task, work on more tasks, and also more of them at the same time. That makes combining older and younger people in a team a challenge (how to align the cycles), but at the same time an advantage: you have two different preferences that help you cherrypick the best each time.

Note that the way younger people work is very consistent with the way the use e.g. social media: short focussed attention burst. And also how ways of working that get more and more into vogue operate. Think of Agile Scrum or Design Thinking: short fast cycles - it's OK to fail (that's how you learn!) and move on. Don't think and specify everything out in detail before you start ('old' way of working)

Bart Groenewoud
22 months ago
Worker Bees V . Management V. Leadership - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
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Clara Wong 王渝佳
22 months ago
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If by "lifestyle performance management," you mean what we've previously called "work-life balance," I would say that Millennials have generally figured out there is no such thing as "work-life balance," only work-life management. As a boomer who has supervised multi-generational teams, I have learned from the Millennials in particular that quality of life depends on making time for life elements other than work! It doesn't come naturally to Boomers or even Gen-Xers, who are more socialized to keep our heads down and work, rather than mixing in breaks, family time, and investment in activities that regenerate our energy and enthusiasm for our jobs.

Elisa Speranza
22 months ago
work-life balance is a misnomer for successful folks - Dr. David E. 11 months ago
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'Theory X' and 'Theory Y'

'Theory X' and 'Theory Y' are theories of human motivation and management. They were created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960s.

These theories describe two contrasting models of workforce motivation applied by managers in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development.

Any thoughts?

Dr. David E. M
11 months ago
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This article might throw some light to the question asked here

As is always true, older workers can teach younger colleagues a thing or two. But education is a two-way street, and older workers can also learn from newer hires. 

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/generational-teachback

Hitesh Mathpal
11 months ago
Many thanks and very interesting - Dr. David E. 11 months ago

Have some input?