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Why does connected life not equal an integrated healthy life?

1
1262 views

Understanding that we have a near "always online" culture, why has no one been able to well integrate the aspects of tailored nutrition, measured sleep, moderate exercise, and good mental health into a complete data picture that would allow targeted interventions leading to better population health?

Matthew Martin
24 months ago

8 answers

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Coonected Life = Lot's of data collected from Sensor - however only collecting data does not add much value.Value addiiton will come when analytics of that data will result in actionable insights that in turn will improve health - may be through screening for a potential disease condition, or checking the adherence to a prescribed therapy. This will need controlled clinical trials on specific disease conditions / therapies to sceintifically establsh the value addiiton and impact.

Arpan Pal
24 months ago
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technology can measure all sorts of things about what you are doing and it can tell you what you should be doing, but it cant give you the motivation, time, or financial resources to do it. For example, a parent may know they should be making healthy, organic meals for their kids but when can they shop and cook between their two jobs, the kids' schedules, and on their minimum wage paychecks? They may be able to work this put but likely would have to invest time and energy to plan ahead that they may wish to invest elsewhere. Also, while individual aspects of health and wellness can be measured, the levels of their effects on each other may not be so clear.

Rebecca Martorella
24 months ago
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Technology has not gotten to the point of being totally invasive. Thankfully free-will is still needed to do things such as making sure the wearable is charged, the meals are logged or the "how are you feeling today" well being questions are answered. Population health is dependent on the population being active participants.Thankfully we are not at the place illustrated by the prophetic movie Wall-E.

Susan Otten
24 months ago
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i would like to add that a major obstacle is that we have not developed strong incentives that could overpower the resistance and difficulties of following a healthy lifestyle. In other words, we do not have the technology to overcome Human Nature, like short term benefits more valuable than longer goals, each additional sacrifice is exponentially harder, etc. So before we can find the technology we need to find the "solutions".

Felix R. Toro, M.D.
24 months ago
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To change health behaviors, individuals have to see the need to change. Research has shown that the provision of information about personal behavior via wearables can be motivating- but only to the motivated.
Realizing, of course, that many health circumstances are beyond our control, we, as a society, will not realize a broader engagement in healthful activities (regardless of information provision) until the unmotivated are motivated. Motivation can be fostered through incentives and penalties, but I would much prefer that informed people would self-direct their behavior with consideration of the better good. At the risk of alienating, let me note that sloth, glutony, and drunkeness (among other behaviors) were once held to be sins and thereby socially restrained. So....while I am all for information technology, I do not believe it is the root problem.

Richard Bohannon
24 months ago
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In addition to the motivational responses so well provided above, I'd add that the shear volume of information probably has a negative effect on follow through.

Megan Hamilton
24 months ago
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This is all about the use of resources and the human touch - ie "Beam me up, Scotty" - the user of the connected devices must have a communication tool with base, this can be given throught their television - some form of motivation tool, This is about the management of society in part, sensor record data that goes to database control, warning lights could motivate a visit and a catch up.

Lawrence Perry MIoD FRSA
23 months ago
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I read recently that behavioural psychologists are finding flaws in Maslows heierarchy of needs theory.
The sense that we prioritise our needs over our desires is a fallacy, and seeking more emotional fulfillment such as connecting with others and feeling the pleasure associated with intoxication can diminish our rational self preservation insticts.
Perhaps we actively avoid statistics and data, as we know intuitively that doing the sensible thing might impact on our enjoyment of life.

Don Smith
22 months ago
Don Smith I've read this as well. And it's more than connecting with others (and this is extremely important) but it's also building resiliency, a sense of purpose, and ability to adapt to change all have a role to play, especially as we age. - Vera 22 months ago

Have some input?