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Influences of the end of net neutrality

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What are mid term and long term aspects of the end of net neutrality in USA for companies outside USA? Does it going to influence this mass migrating to cloud services? What about internalization to USA? If you own a company, are there any changes you will do on your marketing/sales strategy?

Cloud
Internet
Sales
Media
Marketing
Net Neutrality
Internationalization
Ricardo Santos
55 months ago

2 answers

1

People is complaining that this will impact internet users all over the world. The risk looks to move to a pay for play system shutting down startups and new ideas. Internet service providers will empower their position versus consumers. This should take effect in a few months after approval. An interesting article about net neutrality was released on USAToday at https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/12/15/did-fcc-just-take-web-back-2014/955033001/.

Paolo Beffagnotti
55 months ago
Very interesting article. Thank you! - Ricardo 55 months ago
Agreed - Dr. David E. 41 months ago
1

The end of net neutrality, in my personal view, would be one of the most momentous developments of the decade -- if it holds.

The Internet was designed around the idea of decentralized communications and democratization of speech. On the opposite side of the spectrum is a natural desire of governments and large enterprise to inject controls into society that reduce volatility and risk.

It is ironic for the very country that brought us the Internet to now undermine its core reason for being, especially considering the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. If ISPs can control otherwise-legal content, the Internet is not needed. Brought to an extreme example, telecoms and cable companies would serve or "allow" whatever content they wish and network architecture would be irrelevant. This is not the Internet. It is a curated WWW content served by the telecom/cable companies similar to TV channels.

The fact that is it being done by a committee, without the public consensus and under a clearly-false pretense of fueling innovation is another sign of the strange times we live in.

My prediction is that this repeal will not survive legal challenges, as it seems to be just a short term handout to certain telecoms.

If the repeal survives, other types of ISP technologies will emerge, with pier-to-pier networks connecting via unconventional means to the backbone. As this will result in reduced institutional ability to control or monitor traffic, the pendulum will likely swing the other way and the whole silly thing will go away.

In the meantime, said telecoms will get their feed and rearrange the chairs around the table of web content.

Jerry Nonkovic
55 months ago
It makes total sense. I also think this repeal won't go further. To answer this problem, UK did exactly the opposite (https://www.commondreams.org/news/2017/12/20/while-us-attacks-net-neutrality-uk-makes-high-speed-internet-legal-right). - Ricardo 55 months ago
I did some consulting on netneutrality in a country when it was highly regulated (meaning enforced). In this process I concluded that when there is effective competition on ISP and infrastructure level, combined with transparency (public information on filtering / traffic engineering), there is no need for netneutrality regulation. - Ad 54 months ago
Ad, this doesn't work in the U.S. Monopolies will take hold of the market if not kept in check. Telecoms (utilities in general) are particularly more susceptible to monopolies. Self-regulation in this market is a fantasy; over-regulation is opportunity killer. Government agencies' job is to provide sensible consumer protections and not stifle economic growth. Net neutrality rule is that. - Jerry 54 months ago
Ad, if the end result is the same without net neutrality rule, why bother removing the rule? The rule itself costs nothing and causes no issues to parties already not interested in controlling net traffic. - Jerry 54 months ago
Completely agree with " Self-regulation in this market is a fantasy; over-regulation is opportunity killer". In a lot of cases efficient regulation can be used to create competition. In the case were infrastructure competition is not possible, splitting infrastructure from services, is a good alternative. This opening of the infrastructure, is good for pricing and quality (including netneutrality) - Ad 54 months ago
Thanks - Dr. David E. 41 months ago

Have some input?